Heartland Fitness Week: Workout and grocery list - KFVS12 News & Weather Cape Girardeau, Carbondale, Poplar Bluff

Heartland Fitness Week: Workout and grocery list

Posted: Updated:
Trainer Terrance Sterling at Anytime Fitness in Cape Girardeau. Trainer Terrance Sterling at Anytime Fitness in Cape Girardeau.
Terrance Sterling, Personal Trainer Terrance Sterling, Personal Trainer
  • SPONSORED BY SOUTHEAST HEALTHMore>>

  • Beshear: 413,000 sign up for health care in Ky

    Beshear: 413,000 sign up for health care in Ky

    Tuesday, April 22 2014 3:22 PM EDT2014-04-22 19:22:11 GMT
    Kentucky Gov. Steve Beshear says more than 413,410 people have signed up for health insurance through Kentucky's marketplace in the first enrollment period that ended March 31.
    Kentucky Gov. Steve Beshear says more than 413,410 people have signed up for health insurance through Kentucky's marketplace in the first enrollment period that ended March 31.
  • Too little sleep may add to teen health problems

    Too little sleep may add to teen health problems

    Many teens from lower- and middle-income homes get too little sleep, potentially adding to the problems of kids already at risk for health issues, new research finds.
    Many teens from lower- and middle-income homes get too little sleep, potentially adding to the problems of kids already at risk for health issues, new research finds.
  • BJC changes charity care standards

    BJC changes charity care standards

    Sunday, April 20 2014 1:01 PM EDT2014-04-20 17:01:10 GMT
    Charity care has long been a core mission of BJC HealthCare, but the St. Louis area's largest employer is cutting back amid increasing financial pressures.
    Charity care has long been a core mission of BJC HealthCare, but the St. Louis area's largest employer is cutting back amid increasing financial pressures.
  • HealthMore>>

  • People seek out health info when famous person dies

    People seek out health info when famous person dies

    WEDNESDAY, April 23, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The deaths of well-known people offer an opportunity to educate the general public about disease detection and prevention, a new study suggests. Researchers surveyed 1,400 American men and women after Apple co-founder Steve Jobs died of pancreatic cancer in 2011 and learned that more than one-third of them sought information about his cause of death or information about cancer in general soon after his death was reported. About 7 percent of th...
    WEDNESDAY, April 23, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The deaths of well-known people offer an opportunity to educate the general public about disease detection and prevention, a new study suggests. Researchers surveyed 1,400 American men and women after Apple co-founder Steve Jobs died of pancreatic cancer in 2011 and learned that more than one-third of them sought information about his cause of death or information about cancer in general soon after his death was reported. About 7 percent of th...
  • Spouse's sunny outlook may be good for your health

    Spouse's sunny outlook may be good for your health

    Marriage vows often include the promise to stick together for better or for worse, and research now suggests that when it comes to your health, having an optimistic spouse is better.
    Marriage vows often include the promise to stick together for better or for worse, and research now suggests that when it comes to your health, having an optimistic spouse is better.
  • Mental illness not a driving force behind crime

    Mental illness not a driving force behind crime

    TUESDAY, April 22, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Less than 10 percent of crimes committed by mentally ill people are directly linked to the symptoms of their disorders, a new study shows. "When we hear about crimes committed by people with mental illness, they tend to be big headline-making crimes, so they get stuck in people's heads," said study author Jillian Peterson, a psychology professor at Normandale Community College in Bloomington, Minn. "The vast majority of people with mental illness a...
    TUESDAY, April 22, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Less than 10 percent of crimes committed by mentally ill people are directly linked to the symptoms of their disorders, a new study shows. "When we hear about crimes committed by people with mental illness, they tend to be big headline-making crimes, so they get stuck in people's heads," said study author Jillian Peterson, a psychology professor at Normandale Community College in Bloomington, Minn. "The vast majority of people with mental illness a...
  • Latest Health NewsThe Latest from HealthDayMore>>

  • Spouse's sunny outlook may be good for your health

    Spouse's sunny outlook may be good for your health

    Marriage vows often include the promise to stick together for better or for worse, and research now suggests that when it comes to your health, having an optimistic spouse is better.
    Marriage vows often include the promise to stick together for better or for worse, and research now suggests that when it comes to your health, having an optimistic spouse is better.
  • Mental illness not a driving force behind crime

    Mental illness not a driving force behind crime

    TUESDAY, April 22, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Less than 10 percent of crimes committed by mentally ill people are directly linked to the symptoms of their disorders, a new study shows. "When we hear about crimes committed by people with mental illness, they tend to be big headline-making crimes, so they get stuck in people's heads," said study author Jillian Peterson, a psychology professor at Normandale Community College in Bloomington, Minn. "The vast majority of people with mental illness a...
    TUESDAY, April 22, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Less than 10 percent of crimes committed by mentally ill people are directly linked to the symptoms of their disorders, a new study shows. "When we hear about crimes committed by people with mental illness, they tend to be big headline-making crimes, so they get stuck in people's heads," said study author Jillian Peterson, a psychology professor at Normandale Community College in Bloomington, Minn. "The vast majority of people with mental illness a...
  • A little wine might help kidneys stay healthy

    A little wine might help kidneys stay healthy

    An occasional glass of wine might help keep your kidneys healthy, new research suggests.
    An occasional glass of wine might help keep your kidneys healthy, new research suggests.
(KFVS) -

There are many reasons why some of us struggle to get in shape and stay healthy. 

But whatever your obstacles may be, here is a workout plan and grocery list that can help you get in shape and live a healthy lifestyle even with a busy schedule. 

An effective workout you can try is the 'Beginner Full body Blitz! Week' workout:

On Monday and Friday:

Warm up with a 7 minute walk. 

Segment 1: (exercises 1-6 done with no rest in between)

1. machine chest press x 12 reps
2. bodyweight squats x 20 reps
3. barbell shoulder press x 12 reps
4. machine leg press x 20 reps
5. close grip pull down x 12 reps
6. dumbbell stiff leg dead lift x 12 reps

Take a two minute rest and repeat steps 1-6 one more time. 

Segment 2: Slow and steady cardio

1. Perform 20 minutes of cardio on any piece of equipment you choose, while maintaining 120-130 bpm.

On Wednesday

Slow and steady cardio: 

1. 20 minute incline walk maintaining a heart rate of 120-130 bpm
2. 15 minute bike maintaining heart rate of 120-130 bpm
3. 20 minute incline walk maintaining heart rate of 120-130 bpm


When shopping for groceries, take this list with you to fill your cart with healthy foods:

Proteins

  • chicken: fresh or frozen boneless chicken breast or tenderloin, ground white meat chicken
  • seafood: tuna, salmon, cod, tilapia, snapper, mahi mahi, scallops, shrimp, crab meat, sea bass
  • turkey: turkey breast (90% lean or leaner)
  • beef: ground beef (90% lean or leaner), filet, sirloin steak, round and flank
  • dairy: skim milk, string cheese, plain nonfat Greek yogurt, low carb yogurt, low fat cottage cheese, eggs, egg whites
  • protein powder: Ultimate Muscle Protein, Monster Mass
Non-starchy vegetables
  • artichoke
  • asparagus
  • bamboo shoots or water chestnuts
  • cabbage
  • carrots
  • cauliflower
  • celery
  • cucumbers
  • green beans
  • lettuce
  • mushrooms
  • onions, scallions, shallots
  • peppers
  • spinach 
  • sprouts
  • squash and zucchini
  • tomatoes
Fruits
  • apples
  • apricots
  • bananas
  • blueberries
  • cherries
  • cantaloupe
  • cranberries
  • fresh peaches
  • goji berries
  • grapes
  • grapefruit
  • plums and prunes
  • pineapple
  • raspberries
  • strawberries
  • kiwi
  • mangos
  • oranges
  • papaya
  • pears

Complex carbs

  • beans
  • brown rice
  • buckwheat
  • barley
  • edamame
  • Ezekiel bread
  • millet
  • oat bran
  • oatmeal or steel cut oats
  • sweet potatoes or yams
  • quinoa
Fat
  • avocado
  • almonds
  • cashews
  • almond or cashew butter
  • flaxseed and/or flax oil
  • extra virgin olive oil
  • oil and vinegar dressing
  • peanut butter
  • safflower oil
  • sunflower and pumpkin seeds
  • walnuts
Copyright 2013 KFVS. All rights reserved.

Powered by WorldNow

310 Broadway
Cape Girardeau, MO 63701

FCC Public File
publicfile@kfvs12.com
573-335-1212
EEO Report
Closed Captioning

All content © Copyright 2000 - 2014 Worldnow and KFVS12. All Rights Reserved.
For more information on this site, please read our Privacy Policy and Terms of Service.