Cape Girardeau man in South Korea, "nothing really different" - KFVS12 News & Weather Cape Girardeau, Carbondale, Poplar Bluff

Cape Girardeau man in South Korea, "nothing really different"

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Jason Sander is from Cape Girardeau, but has lived in Seoul, South Korea for the past five years. He works as a professor at Korea University. Jason Sander is from Cape Girardeau, but has lived in Seoul, South Korea for the past five years. He works as a professor at Korea University.
While you might think everyone in South Korea is talking about the threats from the North, Sander said that isn't the case. While you might think everyone in South Korea is talking about the threats from the North, Sander said that isn't the case.
He said it's the Americans living in South Korea that are talking about the threats, not native Koreans. He said it's the Americans living in South Korea that are talking about the threats, not native Koreans.
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CAPE GIRARDEAU, MO (KFVS) -

Jason Sander is from Cape Girardeau, but has lived in Seoul, South Korea for the past five years. He works as a professor at Korea University.

"It's on the minds of most people here, but it's in the back of their minds," said Sander.

While you might think everyone in South Korea is talking about the threats from the North, Sander said that isn't the case.

"Honestly if you're here, if you didn't watch the news, nothing's wrong, completely nothing, you don't really notice anything in the streets when you're walking around," said Sander.

He said it's the Americans living in South Korea that are talking about the threats, not native Koreans.

"When I look at the American news, yeah it seems a bit scary," said Sander.

Sander works with the younger generation of native Koreans at the university. He said to them, this is just another day, another threat. It's something they've grown up used to.

"They don't see any difference now and any other time in their life," said Sander.

Sander and his wife have registered with the U.S. Embassy in Seoul. That way they should get a phone or email alert with advanced warning if they need to evacuate.

"I still feel a lot of apprehension, because I know in reality if something were to happen it would be just complete chaos and the chances of getting out of here quickly and easily are very, next to impossible, so realistically when I think about the logistics of it, it's terrifying," said Sander.

He said registering with the embassy is one of the few precautionary measures he can take. But he said he worries if a serious threat comes true, it will be mass chaos.

"It's kind of like the boy who cries wolf, a lot of it, that's how we feel, when do you just pack up and leave, when do you take it seriously and abandon everything we've built here," said Sander.

For now, Sander said they will continue living life as normal as they can.

"It's a situation that's terrible all around, people are just trying to make the best of it, not by simply ignoring the situation but by living the best way they can," said Sander.

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