Walk more to cut heart attack and stroke risk - KFVS12 News & Weather Cape Girardeau, Carbondale, Poplar Bluff

Walk more to cut heart attack and stroke risk

Updated: Dec 20, 2013 09:53 AM
© iStockphoto / Thinkstock © iStockphoto / Thinkstock
  • HealthMore>>

  • The 'Hobby Lobby ruling' and what it means for U.S. health care

    The 'Hobby Lobby ruling' and what it means for U.S. health care

    The U.S. Supreme Court's ruling on contraception coverage -- as mandated under the Affordable Care Act -- could lead to a legal quagmire that might allow companies to deny insurance coverage for any medical practice that violates their religious principles.
    The U.S. Supreme Court's ruling on contraception coverage -- as mandated under the Affordable Care Act -- could lead to a legal quagmire that might allow companies to deny insurance coverage for any medical practice that violates their religious principles.
  • Diet changes can alter gut bacteria

    Diet changes can alter gut bacteria

    Dietary changes can dramatically alter the balance of bacteria in the gut on a daily basis, according to a new study.
    Dietary changes can dramatically alter the balance of bacteria in the gut on a daily basis, according to a new study.
  • Lift U.S. ban on blood donations by gay men

    Lift U.S. ban on blood donations by gay men

    The United States should repeal a 30-year policy that bans blood donations from gay and bisexual men, according to a team of medical and legal experts writing this week in the Journal of the American Medical...
    The United States should repeal a 30-year policy that bans blood donations from gay and bisexual men, according to a team of medical and legal experts writing this week in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

FRIDAY, Dec. 20, 2013 (HealthDay News) -- Walking more is a simple way for people at high risk for type 2 diabetes to greatly reduce their risk of heart disease, a new study suggests.

Researchers analyzed data from more than 9,300 adults with pre-diabetes in 40 countries. People with pre-diabetes have an increased risk of cardiovascular events, such as heart attack and stroke.

All of the study participants were enrolled in programs meant to increase their physical activity, shed excess pounds and cut fatty foods from their diets. The participants' average number of steps taken per day was recorded at the start of the programs and again 12 months later.

Amounts of walking at the start of the programs and changes in amounts of walking over 12 months affected the participants' risk of heart disease, according to the study, which was published Dec. 19 in the journal The Lancet.

For every 2,000 steps more per day a person took at the start of the study, they had a 10 percent lower risk for heart disease in subsequent years. And for every 2,000 steps per day increase during the study period, the risk of heart disease fell an additional 8 percent, the researchers found.

For example, if Person A took 4,000 steps per day at the start of the study and did not change that amount over the next year, and Person B took 6,000 steps per day at the start of the study and increased to 8,000 steps per day during the next year, Person B would have an 18 percent lower risk of heart disease than Person A by the end of the study, the researchers said.

"Our results provide novel evidence that changing physical-activity levels through simply increasing the number of steps taken can substantially reduce the risk of [heart] disease," study leader Dr. Thomas Yates, of the University of Leicester, in England, said in a journal news release.

"Importantly, these benefits are seen regardless of body weight or the starting level of activity," Yates said. "These novel findings provide the strongest evidence yet for the importance of physical activity in high-risk populations and will inform diabetes and cardiovascular disease prevention programs worldwide."

Pre-diabetes affects nearly 8 percent of adults (344 million) worldwide, and the number is projected to rise to 8.4 percent (472 million) by 2030.

More information

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has more about pre-diabetes.

Copyright © 2013 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

*DISCLAIMER*: The information contained in or provided through this site section is intended for general consumer understanding and education only and is not intended to be and is not a substitute for professional advice. Use of this site section and any information contained on or provided through this site section is at your own risk and any information contained on or provided through this site section is provided on an "as is" basis without any representations or warranties.
Powered by WorldNow

310 Broadway
Cape Girardeau, MO 63701

FCC Public File
publicfile@kfvs12.com
573-335-1212
EEO Report
Closed Captioning

All content © Copyright 2000 - 2014 Worldnow and KFVS12. All Rights Reserved.
For more information on this site, please read our Privacy Policy and Terms of Service.