Lupus Foundation Of America Accepting Applications To Fund Lupus Research Studies - KFVS12 News & Weather Cape Girardeau, Carbondale, Poplar Bluff

Lupus Foundation Of America Accepting Applications To Fund Lupus Research Studies

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SOURCE Lupus Foundation of America

New LIFELINE Grant Will Help Sustain Lupus Research That's at the Brink of Breakthrough

WASHINGTON, Jan. 23, 2014 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- The Lupus Foundation of America announced today it is accepting applications to provide critical funding for lupus scientific research, at a time when government funds for lupus research can't keep pace with the accelerating growth of lupus scientific opportunities.  The new LIFELINE Grant Program will provide research funds to help mitigate the potential loss in scientific momentum and loss of current and future lupus investigators due to disappearing federal research funds, just as lupus research is on the brink of breakthroughs.

(Logo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20121113/DC11393LOGO)

The Foundation has issued a 'Request for Applications' (RFA) for the LIFELINE Grant Program along with two other multi-career stage, research grant programs: the Gina M. Finzi Memorial Student Summer Fellowship Program and the Career Development Award.

"Lupus research has arrived at a pivotal moment. Scientific findings and prospects have placed us at the brink of breakthrough in several key areas, yet funds to conduct research on lupus are not sufficient to meet demand and sustain the momentum which has been building in recent years," said Graciela S. Alarcon, MD, MPH, Chair MSAC Research Committee, Lupus Foundation of America. "The vision behind the Lupus Foundation of America's new LIFELINE Grant Program is to provide temporary support for seasoned lupus investigators who experience a gap in external funding for a specific, previously funded research project.  This grant will provide a funding lifeline to continue important studies in lupus that are at a critical point where any interruption would significantly affect their forward progress."

The Gina M. Finzi Memorial Student Summer Fellowship Program seeks to foster interest among medical, graduate and undergraduate students to pursue a career in research areas that are relevant to lupus. The Career Development Award supports the professional development of rheumatology, nephrology, and dermatology fellows, in the United States and Canada who are interested in lupus research as a career. 

Lupus investigators who are interested in these grant opportunities may obtain more information and links to the online applications at www.lupus.org/RFA.  Letters of intent for the LIFELINE Grant Program are due by February 21, 2014; the full application is due by March 21. Applications for the Gina M. Finzi Memorial Student Summer Fellowship Program and the Career Development Award are due by March 28.  To learn more about the Lupus Foundation of America's current grant opportunities visit lupus.org/rfa.

About the Lupus Foundation of America Peer Reviewed Research Program

The Lupus Foundation of America is dedicated to addressing scientific issues that have obstructed basic, clinical, epidemiological, behavioral, and translational lupus research for decades. Our research grant program focuses its support in areas of research where significant gaps in scientific knowledge about lupus exist, and where other public and private organizations are not focusing their efforts. The program supports growth in the field during a time when federal government funding opportunities are limited. Through our peer reviewed lupus research program, the Foundation directly funds lupus investigators to conduct studies in areas identified by our Medical-Scientific Advisory Council.

About Lupus

Lupus is an unpredictable and misunderstood autoimmune disease that ravages different parts of the body. Lupus is a cruel mystery because it is hidden from view and undefined, has a range of symptoms, strikes without warning, and has no known cause and no known cure.  Its health effects can range from a skin rash to a heart attack.  Lupus is debilitating and destructive and can be fatal, yet research on lupus remains underfunded relative to diseases of similar scope and devastation. 

About the Lupus Foundation of America

The Lupus Foundation of America is the only national force devoted to solving the mystery of lupus, one of the world's cruelest, most unpredictable and devastating diseases, while giving caring support to those who suffer from its brutal impact. Through a comprehensive program of research, education, and advocacy, the Foundation leads the fight to improve the quality of life for all people affected by lupus. Learn more about the lupus, Lupus Science & Medicine Journal and the Lupus Foundation of America at lupus.org. For the latest news and updates, follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

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