Tucson woman recovering after 47.5 pound tumor removed - KFVS12 News & Weather Cape Girardeau, Carbondale, Poplar Bluff

Tucson woman making "amazing" recovery after 47.5 pound tumor removed

Posted: Updated:
TUCSON, AZ (Tucson News Now) -

Marcey DiCaro is amazing everyone with her quick recovery and her attitude.

She's making what her doctors call an amazing recovery, after they removed a huge tumor from her body.

The tumor weighed 47.5 pounds.

"I had all kinds of stuff going on. My belly stuck out so that I looked 12 months pregnant. I was--I just didn't have the energy that I once had and it was really zapping me in a lot of ways," DiCaro says.

The tumor was also causing a lot of pain.

A CT scan revealed the tumor a few years ago.

Doctors were concerned that eventually the tumor would invade more and more organs and eventually kill her. The problem was DiCaro had no health insurance, and with a pre-existing condition, she could not get any of the help she needed.

Doctors say DiCaro would need more than surgery to remove the tumor. They say, without long-term care, her life would still be in danger. 

So the tumor continued growing.

Then, along came the Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare. DiCaro says she is eternally grateful.

"Because the clause said you have to allow people to have insurance even if they have pre-existing conditions. That allowed me to get a plan," DiCaro says.

The surgery, done at University of Arizona Medical Center in April, took ten hours. The tumor had surrounded DiCaro's right kidney, so doctors had to remove the organ.

The tumor also had damaged the inferior vena cava, the vein that carries blood from the lower body to the heart.

Doctors had to rebuild it.

The tumor was taking up a lot of space inside DiCaro's body.

"I mean, even before surgery I know it's big. But then once you remove it, I say, wow. That's really big," says UAMC Abdominal Surgeon Dr. Tun Jie.

Dr. Jie says the surgery was challenging, to say the least.

"Trying to move this tumor without sacrificing other important organs like the intestine, the arteries, the liver," Jie says.

DiCaro's heart stopped more than once during surgery.

She says she's grateful to her medical team. Her doctors are amazed by her.

"One thing that's amazing to me is how quick she actually recovered. I mean given the extent of the surgery. I think it's all good for her," says Dr. Jie.

DiCaro says, "What can I say? I just knew I was coming back."

She says the little things mean so much now.

"Today I had a massage and for the first time in three years, I could lie on my stomach."

DiCaro continues to recover and keep that positive attitude.

She believes it, and her involvement in natural healing and the support it brings, are why she's doing so well.

Asked if she thinks this is all a miracle.

She says, "Absolutely."

"I just feel like I have a new lease on life and I'm not going to dwell on the possibilities of things coming back or, you know, what else negatively can happen," DiCaro says. "I will do everything to keep myself healthy and vibrant and alive."

Copyright 2014 Tucson News Now All rights reserved.

 

  • Health ConnectionMore>>

  • Tucson ALS clinic, research lab of fruit flies help Southern Arizona patients

    Tucson ALS clinic, research lab of fruit flies help Southern Arizona patients

    Tuesday, September 2 2014 6:52 PM EDT2014-09-02 22:52:03 GMT
    Joel with his daughter, AnissaJoel with his daughter, Anissa
    Sanchez said he's overwhelmed by the support he's received from so many people who did the Ice Bucket Challenge on his behalf.
    Sanchez said he's overwhelmed by the support he's received from so many people who did the Ice Bucket Challenge on his behalf.
  • Low-carb beats low-fat for weight loss, heart health

    Low-carb beats low-fat for weight loss, heart health

    For people who want to lose weight and boost their heart health, cutting down on carbohydrates may work better than trimming dietary fat, a new study suggests.
    For people who want to lose weight and boost their heart health, cutting down on carbohydrates may work better than trimming dietary fat, a new study suggests.
  • Arizona Cannabis Nurses sue state over PTSD ruling

    Arizona Cannabis Nurses sue state over PTSD ruling

    Arizona Cannabis Nurses sue state over PTSD ruling

    Tuesday, September 2 2014 1:51 AM EDT2014-09-02 05:51:26 GMT
    The Arizona Cannabis Nurses association has filed a lawsuit against the Arizona Department of Health Services, over a ruling that affects those suffering from PTSD.Even though the department's director Will Humble issued a decision last month, stating those with PTSD could get access to medical marijuana starting in January, 2015 those in the medical marijuana industry are questioning some of the stipulations attached to that decision.Heather Manus, the president of the AZ Cannabis Nurses Ass...
    The Arizona Cannabis Nurses association has filed a lawsuit against the Arizona Department of Health Services, over a ruling that affects those suffering from PTSD.Even though the department's director Will Humble issued a decision last month, stating those with PTSD could get access to medical marijuana starting in January, 2015 those in the medical marijuana industry are questioning some of the stipulations attached to that decision.Heather Manus, the president of the AZ Cannabis Nurses Ass...
Powered by WorldNow

310 Broadway
Cape Girardeau, MO 63701

FCC Public File
publicfile@kfvs12.com
573-335-1212
EEO Report
Closed Captioning

All content © Copyright 2000 - 2014 Worldnow and KFVS12. All Rights Reserved.
For more information on this site, please read our Privacy Policy and Terms of Service.