9/10/02 - Fair Favorites - KFVS12 News & Weather Cape Girardeau, Carbondale, Poplar Bluff

9/10/02 - Fair Favorites

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Funnel cakes, corn dogs and salt water taffy are just a few of the tasty treats you can sample at the fair. Even though they taste great, it may take you a while to burn off all the calories you take in while you're there.

Not too many of us worry about counting calories when we go to the fair, which is a good thing. Because if you try to count all the fat in your favorite fair foods, it could make you dizzy!

For many fairgoers, the midway at the SEMO District Fair is the first place to stop and indulge in all the fine fair cuisine. Fairgoer Jane Hampson says, "It's fun to come and eat something that you don't eat at home, like corn dogs and cotton candy. I don't care about the calories." Fairgoer Sabrina Tate says, "It gives me a chance to be a junk food freak for a moment. One week a year I come down here to eat and the rest of the year I work it off."

And that's about how long it could take! Satisfying your sweet tooth at the fair, means adding thousands of calories. Let's start with caramel apples. The apple itself is pretty healthy, only 56 calories. But when you add the caramel it's 270 calories. That's not counting then ones with toppings like nuts and sprinkles! Funnel cakes are a fair favorite, they weigh in at 290 calories each. And what about that taffy being churned out piece by piece? A quarter pound has 450 calories. The newest item to satisfy your sweet tooth, deep fried candy bars. It's a regular Snickers bar, dipped in the same stuff they use to make funnel cakes, then deep fried and sprinkled with powered sugar. Just the candy bar has 280 calories, so you can imagine what one of those would do to your waistline.

Corn dogs are also a favorite for fair goers, but they're loaded with calories, one corn dog has 460. What about polish sausage? They may be good, but one has anywhere from 400 to 800 calories. There's a lot of fair food to choose from, which could mean making some tough decisions on what to buy. The best thing you can do is don't overdo it, choose your favorite and enjoy, in moderation.

Even though fair foods are high in fat and calories, the fair does only come around once a year. It's not like you eat fair food everyday, so eating in moderation is okay.

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